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Death

Discussion in 'Culture & Religion' started by dong, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. TheoryAll

    TheoryAll New Member

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    Death the trip of a lifetime. I feel like its an adventure that you hae when the time is just right. I'm not worried about it, are you?
     
  2. paf_2

    paf_2 Member

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    Well, when I was younger I was afraid of death. It shounded like a scary thing, because well I grew up Catholic, do I need to say more. Yes, the religion of be good or fire and brimstone await you. The older I got though and started to broaden my thought patterns on the after life along with losing people I loved I began to realize this wasn't something to fear at all. Death is the final stage of life no doubt about that, but there is something beyond this life, I know that because I have seen the signs given to me that it does exist. I don't think there is two separate places one for the good and one for the bad but just a place known as the after life. This is just my theory I could be wrong.
     
  3. Jason76

    Jason76 Active Member

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    You can't escape death so you might as well be mature about it. Hopefully, an afterlife exists for those who follow the rules. However, according to one atheist I conversed with on the internet, nature doesn't owe us anything. Either way, as I said before, we can't do anything about it, so worrying is a waste of time. The whole idea is similar to the situation where people are worrying about nuclear war.
     
  4. Diana Smith

    Diana Smith New Member

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    I used to think that death was the end of a consciousness. My view abruptly changed when I experienced what is known as a NDE (Near Death Experience) while I was in labor giving birth to my son. I was able to watch what was happening in the room from outside of my body and at first I didn't even realize it was my body at all. From the perspective of up above everyone that was in the room and in one corner I saw numerous nurses and medical professionals enter the room when they called a code blue. I saw my then husband pick up my daughter who was 20 months old at the time and whisk her out of the room in response to an attending doctor. There were 14 medical personnel in the room when they all rushed in. They placed an oxygen mask over my mouth and nose and began chest compressions. One doctor said that they were going to have to "take the baby, they didn't have much time". Then I don't know why I looked up and saw my aunt Rosalie who had passed about seven years earlier and she thought but I didn't hear her voice, just her thoughts that I had to go back to raise my babies. Next thing I knew I was being shoved back in through the top of my head and I opened my eyes to my own OBGYN saying "She's back". My son was born the natural way about half an hour later.

    I will never forget it and the feeling of my aunt being there smiling at me and feeling how much she loves me.

    So, any thoughts on this? And please do NOT tell me it was a hallucination because it absolutely was real!
     
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  5. pocketfullofshells

    pocketfullofshells Well-Known Member

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    I prefer it to not happen to people I like for a long time?
     
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  6. pocketfullofshells

    pocketfullofshells Well-Known Member

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    so your on meds, your o2 is low, , but you don't think its possible that maybe your brain was not functioning at 100%
     
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  7. Walter

    Walter Administrator Staff Member

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    I bring this thread back to life because I want to share two heart breaking articles with you:

    "I knew nothing would be the same again" - Guardian readers on their partner's death:
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/dec/05/readers-death-partner-share-experience-coping

    Guardian readers from around the world tell us what death means to them:
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeand...ng-it-consumes-you-readers-on-death-and-dying

    Personally, I had my fair share of losses. My father died a few years ago as an old man, last year my brother was murdered during a vacation in a foreign country, I lost uncles, aunts, cousins. When I was young and worked as a social worker, one of the teenagers I worked with was raped and murdered (what a shame, she was on a good way back to society but trusted the wrong man).
    So I have some experience with death - but to be honest, I still can't cope with it. My own inevitable death is no big thing for me, but losing others stills feels silly, useless, a gigantic waste.
     
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  8. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    I understand you're getting married? Think of the future..... I love to watch my two kids growing up and enjoying the triumphs of their lives and helping them through the hard times as best we can knowing that we've raised to pretty good humans who we can feel proud of when they take their place in the world. I'm pretty sure your mum and dad looked at you with a sparkle in their eyes and felt the same pride of a job well done.
     
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  9. Walter

    Walter Administrator Staff Member

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    Oh, no problem, I'm a very optimistic person.
     
  10. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    Unnatural deaths are hard for anyone I believe. They bother me certainly. Natural ones, even if untimely I do ok with.
    My dad for example, he was old and becoming infirm so when his annurism hit I really couldn't feel but so badly over. I miss him terribly still but I also believe he's still in my life just in a different way.
     
  11. Walter

    Walter Administrator Staff Member

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    Same here (even the same cause of death).
     
  12. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    How do I feel about death? As I get older (much older, now), I am looking at it as a place of peace, serenity. I have had a great life, accomplished and experienced so much more than I ever even dreamed I would, and I hope I can still experience new events, new places, new people. I hope I can still contribute something, if not TO something, at least to someone.

    My kids have grown up into independent, high functioning adults, with good families and a sense of fairness. My grandkids have great parents who love them and who will assure that they reach adulthood and become fair, conscientious adults, ready to participate and contribute to their world. So I don't have to worry about them.

    My husband is 11 years older than I am, and not in very good health, so logic (I know. . .logic doesn't choose who dies first!) would say that he will be gone before I go, so I don't have to worry about him.

    So I look at death almost like getting ready for bed after a long, productive and yet pleasant day, like getting ready for a good night sleep from which I won't wake up.

    I feel very peaceful and fearless about death. But I hope when it comes, it comes quickly. I would like to prolong my life, NOT prolong my death.
     
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  13. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    I think thats probably true for everyone but sadly and I think in most cases it doesn't happen. I had to watch my Mother dying of cancer she just lingered on and on with the doctors constantly feeding her painkillers and god knows what else. It was pointless. An exercise in futility. All my sisters I wanted to do was turn off the machines and stop the flow end the whole ridiculous sham and just let her go with what was left of her dignity. My lasting memory of my mother is not my mother just some grey husk struggling to breathe through chemical induced existence.
     
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  14. Walter

    Walter Administrator Staff Member

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    A sad way to die.
     
  15. Openmind

    Openmind Well-Known Member

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    Yes, this is I call prolonging death, not life. just a few weeks ago, I was given a wake up call when my blood tests showed extremely elevated measures in my liver. Being a cancer survivor already, it was an extremely bad sign, and for a few days, the likelyhood of having to face a cancer of the liver was very real. It helped me clear up my feelings about an eventual death. . .until a cartscan showed there was no sign of cancer.

    Instead, I was diagnosed with toxic hepatitis, probably due to an intolerance to some antibiotics I was taken at the time. I was told that my liver would go back to "normal" within a few months, probably without permanent damage.

    All that to say that, faced with a slow and painful death, I was very glad that, in the country where I live, the right to die a dignified death is in place, and I started the paper work to choose euthanasia if/when I was faced with such a death.

    I am sorry, Scotsman, that you had to witness your loved one's painful and long death. I worked as a social worker with people with AIDS in the 90's, when AIDS still led to death, before it became more of a "managed" lifelong disease. Although none of my loved ones were among my clients, I felt the pain of those clients, and the few families who chose to not abandon them (as many had!). I so wish they had a choice at that time in central California to have a choice between the long suffering (emotional as well as physical) and euthanesia.
     
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