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In Mexico City, the worst thoing it couls happen to you is to fall into de hands of the police

Discussion in 'Political Humor' started by Rafael Norma, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. Rafael Norma

    Rafael Norma Active Member

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    In #DF in particular and throughout the whole Republic, in general, the worst that can happen to you, is to fall into the hands of justice, because you are always guilty whenever the police has detained you




    It doesn't matter who is in power, @prdmexico, pridehoy or @AccionNacional


    [​IMG]
     
  2. Rafael Norma

    Rafael Norma Active Member

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    @Mondragonykalb has discovered gunpowder, black wire and hot water:

    [​IMG] “In Mexico City it isn’t true that there are few streets, but ta lot of cars” [​IMG][/URL]

    URBAN SPRAWLING

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  3. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    And Obama wants the same or worse for the US
     
  4. Rafael Norma

    Rafael Norma Active Member

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  5. Rafael Norma

    Rafael Norma Active Member

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    @usagov=@gobfed and all over the world are the same s***. To live outside the budget, is to be always mistaken
     
  6. Johnny Tremain

    Johnny Tremain Well-Known Member

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    WHY anyone would EVER go to Mexico--escapes me.
    WHY anyone would ever LIVE in Mexico--escapes me.

    It ranks with many other places--where people risk death just to escape.
     
  7. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    the tomatos. way better than here.
     
  8. Rafael Norma

    Rafael Norma Active Member

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    ¿
    Dile Adiós, dile adiós a tus derechos constitucionales

    CISPA 2.0: Say Goodbye to Our Constitutional Rights

    Sunday, 03 March 2013 09:51
    By Chris Paulus, Occupy.com | News Analysis
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    (Photo: Inmediahk / flickr)
    The unrelenting attack on our civil liberties and our privacy continues. Last year we managed to survive an onslaught of legislation that would have destroyed entrepreneurship and free enterprise on the Internet, and our ability to define how we share music, art and information in general.
    First there was the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act, or SOPA and PIPA, respectively: two pieces of legislation geared at protecting the copyrights of monopolistic media companies and taking drastic measures to enforce them, like shutting down websites that allow the sharing of this copyrighted material for free. The New Zealand police raid of the house of Kim Dotcom, founder of Megaupload, and the site's subsequent shutdown by the FBI provided a glimpse of what lies ahead if laws like these are passed.
    The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, or ACTA, took measures a step further by allowing governments to monitor the Internet to enforce copyright law and supposed intellectual property rights. Tens of thousands of Europeans mobilized in response, telling businesses and politicians that companies could not intrude on fundamental human rights, or morph and twist the law to enforce their hand-picked business model.
    But despite resounding political opposition in the U.S. and worldwide to Internet censorship and infringements on freedom of speech and privacy, our callous and out-of-touch politicians managed to craft an even scarier piece of legislation: CISPA.
    The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act passed in April of 2012 in the House by a vote of 248 to 168, but stalled in the Senate because of a disagreement over privacy concerns. At the time, the White House threatened to veto the law because Obama’s advisers raised additional privacy concerns, chief among them Howard Schmidt, who resigned suddenly last May after the bill’s introduction. Schmidt also helped author statements against SOPA and PIPA.
    But lo and behold, the two principal authors of the CISPA bill, Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (R-Mich.) and Sen. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Calif.), re-introduced the same exact bill several weeks ago on February 12 – presumably in response to recent so-called cyber-attacks from China and security breaches by the hacktivist group Anonymous, whose non-violent actions are a direct response to government's malfeasance and abuse of online authority.
    The provisions stipulated in the CISPA legislation are intimidating and far-reaching. Although CISPA does not require private companies to share information with the government, it opens the floodgates for an unprecedented and endless funneling of private communication information to federal military intelligence agencies such as the NSA and the FBI. The only justification for a company to share information with the government is broadly and vaguely defined by a single term: “cybersecurity.”
    Additionally, CISPA would override current privacy law such as the Wiretap Act and the Stored Communications Act; in fact, it grants companies complete immunity from judicial oversight and prosecution for the violation of privacy. Under CISPA, information provided to the government would be exempt from FOIA requests.
    Furthermore, CISPA does not require companies to notify the individuals from whom they’re collecting data or information – which makes its section about the ability to form a lawsuit against the government little more than a formality.
    “If [this bill is] passed,” claims Namecheap, a domain service opposing CISPA, “the U.S. government gains the power to ask your ISP about any/all of your online activities and personal information. Advocated under the premise of anti-terrorism legislation, this legislation is so broad that it threatens to endanger the privacy of every individual and ordinary and law abiding citizens.
    "This act makes your private online activity now public, giving ISPs the right to share your personal information completely without your knowledge, due process, or authorization.”
    The same day that CISPA was reintroduced, President Obama signed an executive order that deals specifically with information sharing by the owners and operators of CI, or critical infrastructure, such as the banking, communication, transportation and utility industries.
    It would not require the passing along of our private information to the government. Additionally, the executive order focuses on the government's sharing of information that it can already legally collect with the CI companies - instead of its rights to gather new information from private ISPs, as stipulated in CISPA.
    Part of the reason SOPA and PIPA were booted from Congress was the overwhelming citizen mobilization against it, but also because companies like Google, Firefox, Tumblr, Twitter, Wikipedia and other giant Internet businesses realized the legislation would devastate their enterprises.
    Unfortunately, this time around, we won't have these companies fighting on our side because CISPA grants them immunity from lawsuits and has provided them with enough assurance that it will not affect their business in any significant way.
    The drafting and introduction of SOPA, PIPA, ACTA and CISPA are all examples of our elected leaders' growing disregard for citizens' fundamental privacy rights, Constitutional rights and free speech rights as manifested in the digital world. Essentially, this legislation provides the formality our government needs to legitimize and legalize what it is either currently doing or what it wants to do. Just look at the NSA, which is already performing extensive and unprecedented data-mining on U.S. citizens in flagrant violation of the Fourth Amendment – but using only vague legislation to justify it.
    Passing CISPA will be a significant step in America's already far-progressed trudge towards a police state -- and will, more specifically, encourage already-compliant businesses to provide our personal information to our government as if those two enshrined words did not exist: Constitutional rights.
    .[/size]
     
  9. Rafael Norma

    Rafael Norma Active Member

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  10. Rafael Norma

    Rafael Norma Active Member

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    #Alleged_Justice

    http://tinyurl.com/aodux68
    http://tinyurl.com/olms5o8

    @jepardinas @scjn @tsjdf @M_ebrard @prdmexico @pridehoy @accionnacional

    by Juan E. Pardinas

    (November 17th., 2013.- Few signals are so ominuos about Mexico’s future, as the trial against Layda Negrete and Roberto Hernández, producers of the documentary film Presumed Guilty. Two brave Mexicans that denounced the Kafkaesque labyrinth of courts, that now become their new victims. A branch of a government in charge of ensuring justice has turned into a revenge dispenser

    Presumed Guilty saved the life of its protagonist and sowed million hopes among those who atended the teathers. Thanks to the testimonies that made the documentary, , Antonio Zúñiga was saved of spending the rest of his life in jail, paying for a crime he did not commit. Seeing the film, many viewers thought that the film denounce would catalyse a rapid change in our corrupt judges and courts . The film became a social and a political event.. Sighing presidential and legislador precandidates, secretaries of state, governors and congressmen ”shared their outrage at the cruel absurdity portrayed by the documentary film. Mexico City Mayor, @M_Ebrard, proclaimed that he would seek to introduce cameras to record all the trials, that would contribute to the implementation of oral trails.

    Now, three years later, the producers of the film, Negrete and Hernández are barred from the trial record where they are accused of moral damages for 3 billion pesos. Those who supposedly applauded Presumed Guilty, now abandon their creators at the mercy of the alleged Superior Court Justice in the Federal District (@tsjdf).

    The quality of an institution can be measured by the quality of their leadership. Edgar Elías Azar, president of TSJDF, took offense at seeing Presumed Guilty. However, the reason for the grievance, was not that an innocent went to jail and that a murderer was on the street, but the image portrayed of the judges: "We present an edited movie, mutilated, tampered with. This movie is not reality ". We will have to explain to the learned Judie that all movies are edited and even the Academy of Motion Picture Arts delivers an Oscar in this category. In the hands of a man with vision and leadership, Presumed Guilty would have been the perfect incentive to reform the justice system of Mexico City. Given the thin skin of mediocrity, the film is an expletive

    Elias Azar had an obvious vested interest in defending the pride of his sullied guild. Judges themselves are the electors who vote for who will be the President of the Court. In December 2011, ten months after the premiere of the film, Elias Azar won reelection with 61 of 79 possible votes. Among his campaign promises, the judge-candidate pledged to install cameras in each of the criminal courts, as a method of combating corruption. However, in the lawsuit against Negrete and Hernández takes place behind closed doors with no media access. Elias Azar leads a justice system where judges are unfair trials, accusations without proof, arrest without warrant of apprehension and typists to omit evidence in the files. Despite these shortcomings, 95% of judgments are damning.


    For every innocent convicted, there is one criminal impunity. Until denouncing reform perversions by Presumed Guilty, we can not have a safe city and country. While judges are not accountable for their acts and omissions, the right to justice is just a naive aspiration in the lyrics of the Constitution. The trial Layda and Roberto is a compelling battle between two Mexicos, which aims to change and which endeavors to stay the same. If they receive an adverse ruling, the damned are us all.

    Twitter: @jepardinas

    [​IMG]

    @ManceraMiguelMx
    padrote de la Ciudad de México,
    consen de ambulantes,
    franeleros,
    valet parKINGS,
    y viene-vienes,

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
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