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Wages rise on California farms. Americans still don’t want the job

Discussion in 'Business & Economics' started by PLC1, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Yep. As you readily prove ignorance is a trend with no end.
     
  2. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    ..are you implying that American farmers can’t do research?
     
  3. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Nope. Just stating there are a limited amount of crops that the farmer can grow that requires minimum labor, and still make a living. This is especially true ot the ones that own family farms, and have limited acreage.
     
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  4. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    So nothing to add. But you did +1 your post count !
     
  5. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Could say the same for this tripe you posted. :rolleyes:
     
  6. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    Neither do people who are afraid of being deported, which is why the employers like illegals and why the law against hiring them isn't being enforced.
     
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  7. dogtowner

    dogtowner Moderator Staff Member

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    Last phrase is the root of this problem. Put a few employers in the slammer and watch what happens.
    Easiest way to deal with 20 million is put the fear of God into the thousands enabling the problem.
    Behind bars does a great job of this. Per walk the head of HR for Tyson chicken after you round up a few dozen in one if their plants and see what effect that has.
     
  8. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    They already did that, and nothing changed. Kind of like saying put a few gangbangers in prison, and watch what happens.

    Like putting a bunch of terrorists in GITMO?

    Did that too. Didn't work.

    You really don't have a clue.
     
  9. PLC1

    PLC1 Moderator Staff Member

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    That would no doubt end the hiring of illegal labor.

    But it will never happen. It's so much more politically advantageous to blame the illegals themselves and talk of building a wall on the border.

    The employers vote, and they contribute to political campaigns.
     
  10. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    then collectivise, adapt or give up... If you're advocating minimum scale farming then perhaps find a niche market; sell to a local population that demand a premium product or find a "foodie market" artisan food/farming is now big business. If you're advocating carrying on regardless and just decrying the state of the world then market forces will prevail and I guess these guys are dinosaurs - just another herd of aged mastadons bellowing over a swamp at how bad life is treating them!
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2017
  11. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    What a load of crap. Technology drives people out of work, just like the automobile did, and there are fewer alternatives, yet they are now "mastadons"? Yes, "artisan farming" is big business, at the moment anyway. How many 20 acre farms can make a living at it? Get above 20 acres, and you need to hire help. And if you are advocating that there are no limitations created by "market forces" then you fail to understand economics.
     
  12. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    Quite possibly.
    please re-write into a coherent structure...
    I agree.
    Make a living at farming what?
    Is that an absolute?
    These are your words not mine.

    have a cup of tea...:)
     
  13. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    It is coherent. Sorry you cannot understand the concept.

    That was the point.

    Have you even raised a garden?

    Based on your comments.

    Sorry. Don't drink caffeine products. ;)
     
  14. The Scotsman

    The Scotsman Well-Known Member

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    Technology can be used in a gobsmacking number of avenues in the agricultural world, today's farming methodology is all about technology - this isn't the day of farmer Giles plodding down the furrow with Dobbin the donkey and his drawn plough scattering seed from his wicker basket! Technology has vastly improved the world of agriculture and its ability to feed the population! So please reconstruct your sentence in order to explain to me why technology should not play a role in how modern farmers ply their trade.

    Gardens are not commercial farms, we are discussing the large-scale production, processing, and packaging of food using modern equipment and methods. If small farms cannot compete then they should adapt or die - market forces! If farms cannot obtain labour at the wages offered according to market forces then they should adapt or die. If they do not grow what the market is demandeing then they should adapt or die. Its useless to whine over the garden fence that Miguel has pissed off to the farm up the road because I can't compete with their wages - its just useless gum flapping - dinosuars wittering on about something which they either adapt to or die!

    I'm not a farmer but can imagine that if I were I would be looking at a business plan to maximise my acreage with the most advantageous crop for my soil structures having identified my markets and pricing structures using the most upto date methods of planting and harvesting.
     
  15. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    Never said it could not. However. like in the coal industry the new technology eliminates jobs, and eventually will eliminate even the small artisan farmer. Like in the corporate world, the artisan farmer cannot compete when the corporate farm can sell the goods at a lower price then the farmer can grow the crop for.

    Does that make it easier for you to understand?

    My first degree after getting out of the military was in Dairy/Livestock Management. Then I went to being a dairy herdsman, and eventually a premier calf raiser on the West Coast. And I have been gardening since I was 7 years old (my comment about your not being a gardener was based on your obvious lack of knowledge in the field). Today we do have artisan farmers like around the Eugene Oregon area, and they usually produce products like wine, grapes, apples, pears, squash, etc. that they sell at farmers markets. Others are growing organic beef, chicken, hog, etc., and some even have small dairies. The average size of these farms/ranches is around 20-100 acres. Now, in order to plant 20 acres to squash, peppers, carrots, etc., takes a lot of man hours, and manual labor in spite of the planters technology has provided. side from the actual planting, there is the hoeing, watering, etc.

    Anyway, I am not going to go into detail about all that is required. I might suggest you actually do some research on the topic,
     
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