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Public Banking?

Discussion in 'Business & Economics' started by Old_Trapper70, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. Old_Trapper70

    Old_Trapper70 Well-Known Member

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    During the Great Recession private banks (Wall Street) was bailed out to the tune of billions of dollars, and while the middle class lost trillions of dollars in accumulated wealth, the wealthiest Americans actually gained trillions of dollars in accumulated wealth. Only one State did not see a loss of banks, and that was North Dakota the only State to have public banking. The Founding Fathers for the most part, opposed a Central Bank such as we have now with the Federal Reserve. It is time for change:

    http://inthesetimes.com/article/20044/the-fight-for-public-banking

    "Legislators, Brown says, commonly object that governments “don’t have the money to lend.” But this misunderstands how banks operate. “We’re not lending the revenues, just putting them in a bank.” That is, the deposits themselves—in this case tax revenues—are not what banks loan out. Instead, banks create new money by extending credit. Deposits simply balance a bank’s books. Public banks, then, expand the local money supply available for economic development. And while PBI has yet to successfully charter a bank, there’s an existing model in the unlikeliest of places: North Dakota.

    During the Progressive Era, a political organization of prairie populists known as the Nonpartisan League took control of the state government. In 1919, they established the Bank of North Dakota. It has no branches, no ATMs, and one main depositor: the state, its sole owner. From that deposit base, BND makes loans for economic development, including a student loan program.

    BND also partners with local private banks across the state on loans that would normally be too big for them to handle. These loans support infrastructure, agriculture and small businesses. Community banks have thrived in North Dakota as a result; there are more per capita than in any other state, and with higher lending totals. During the financial crisis, not a single North Dakota bank failed.

    BND loans are far more affordable than those from private investors. BND’s Infrastructure Loan Fund, for example, finances projects at just two percent interest; municipal bonds can have rates roughly four times as high. And according to its 2015 annual report, the most recent available, BND had earned record profits for 12 straight years (reaching $130 million in 2015), during both the Great Recession and the state’s more recent downturn from the collapse in oil prices. A 2014 Wall Street Journal story described BND as more profitable than Goldman Sachs. Over the last decade, hundreds of millions of dollars in BND earnings have been transferred to the state (although the overall social impact is somewhat complicated by the bank’s role in sustaining the Bakken oil boom)."

    http://www.publicbankinginstitute.org/faq
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2017
  2. grumpy

    grumpy Active Member

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